Sapiens Review

If you follow me on Goodreads, then you may have seen the painstakingly slow journey I have been on in the past months with Yuval Noah Harari’s nonfiction bestseller Sapiens. It felt a bit like a textbook at times, which contributed to it being a pretty slow read. But it was definitely something that I wanted to read all the way through, because most of its readers have been raving about it since its publication in 2015.

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Who Made God? Part 1

Recently, when I was perusing the shelves at one of my favorite bookstores, I found a book on display called If God Made the Universe, Who Made God?: 130 Arguments for Christian Faith. It’s an anthology of writings from different apologists. The book calls each piece an argument, and some are arguments (albeit bad ones), but a lot of the short pieces are just… bad excuses that apologists have for why it’s okay that their bible and their beliefs don’t make sense. Continue readingWho Made God? Part 1″

The Evolution of My Book Collection

I love books. It’s debatable whether I love reading more than I love browsing at bookstores and just hoarding books, but book collecting has probably become my #1 hobby. I’d say that reading itself is a close second.

A few weeks ago, I chronicled “my life in books,” shared what kinds of young adult fiction I was into as a teenager, and told a little about when I started reading again when I got The God Delusion in college. Since then I’ve bought over 130 other “atheist” books, which might sound crazy, and honestly, it probably is. But almost all of my books are used, and most were less than $5 each.

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Breaking the Spell Review

For the last two months, I’ve been getting to know the work of the fourth horseman of atheism: Daniel Dennett. I’ve read and reviewed the other three, Dawkins, Hitchens, and Harris, before this, and I’ve found it interesting to get to know each author’s writing style and area of expertise. Dawkins is an evolutionary biologist, Hitchens takes a political science approach, and Harris and Dennett each take their own individual approach to psychology. But from what I’ve seen, Dennett is the only one with the greatest amount of reserve when critiquing religion when it seems that the other authors are attacking it.

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