Apologetics 102: An Introduction

I’m finally going to start a new series that I’ve been so excited to share on here for over a month, which is…. more apologetics! Rather than taking another class, I’m going to be looking at an apologetics book written by a professor from my college. I decided that it was so bad that I would review and critique it as I went along instead of one long review at the end of the book, which I usually do. Continue reading “Apologetics 102: An Introduction”

Is Atheism a Choice?

I know that one can control their being an atheist more than they could control being gay. We don’t have any control over our sexual orientation. But the control that we have over what we believe is more complex than “none at all”. In my opinion, I can control what I read and what information and arguments I choose to expose myself to. I can deliberate on what makes the most sense, or if I see some sense in both sides of an argument, I will usually choose to dig deeper on the topic until I find a more concrete answer. What I can’t control is what conclusion I come to. Continue reading “Is Atheism a Choice?”

The Argument from Objective Morality

I once wrote an essay on why a naturalistic worldview does not invariably lead to nihilism. In this essay, I argued that morality is objective with or without a god. I tried (so hard) to use this to make the case that there is a definite black-and-white law of right and wrong (yes, I used C.S. Lewis’ reasoning to make this point) within the human race, because I believed that without it, nihilism would ensue. I had been told once that anyone who is honest with herself and is a true nihilist would, in the end, commit suicide because of life’s overwhelming meaninglessness. It’s understandable that given this factor, I saw the link between naturalism and nihilism to be a deadly one, so I tried my very best to argue for atheistic objective morality.

Continue reading “The Argument from Objective Morality”

My Atheist Bookshelf

When I moved into my dorm room to start my senior year of college last August, I went on a shopping spree of atheist books with which to fill my new bookshelf. At that point, I had eight atheist books and seven Christian books, and I had seven more atheist books coming in the mail from Thriftbooks (which I highly recommend: I bought seven books for $26!). Since then, my bookshelf has been slowly expanding through gifts from my fiance and romantic trips to used bookstores together on rainy Sunday afternoons, as well as random orders from Thriftbooks. I’ve only made it through four and a half books so far, but of course I accumulate more much faster than I read.

Continue reading “My Atheist Bookshelf”

My Fiancé’s Secular University Experience

Almost a year ago, my wonderful fiancé (boyfriend at the time) wrote a guest post for me about his journey away from religion through his life. Here, he has further expanded on how the lack of religion has impacted his experience at his secular university.


Warning: What you are about to read is an account of my experience at a secular university, which some may find very disturbing.

Continue reading “My Fiancé’s Secular University Experience”

Apologetics 101: Lesson 3

Hello and welcome to this week’s installment of The World’s Worst and Most Useless Class! If you’ve been following along in my Apologetics 101 series (here and here), then you’ll know that I signed up for this class to learn a thing or two about Christian apologetics and arguments for God that I could expect a Christian to use against me. You’ll also know that I’ve learned neither of these things. Actually, I’ve learned nothing. Continue reading “Apologetics 101: Lesson 3”

Apologetics 101: Lesson 2

Last semester, I signed up to take Apologetics 101 in the hopes that I might learn something and that it would challenge me at least a little to think about arguments for Christianity so that I could better refute them. I didn’t have very high expectations, but what expectations I did have were certainly failed. The biggest problem within this class is that the teacher is a nutcase, and he doesn’t teach out of a textbook. Everything he teaches is self-proclaimed truth with no sources to back it up. This wouldn’t be so bad if it influenced only his personal beliefs, but I can’t stand when he feeds information that I know is wrong to a classroom of college students. I often feel that even as an atheist, I could teach Christian apologetics better than he could! Continue reading “Apologetics 101: Lesson 2”