Answers in Genesis Doesn’t Understand Human Evolution

Since I first read the story of the groundbreaking 1974 discovery of possible human ancestor Lucy, I have been captivated by the study of human origins. I felt as if during my atheistic indignation at the fantastical creation stories in the bible, paleoanthropology took my hand and showed me that there is an entire field of study that strives to learn where humans really came from. I’ve been baffled that more people weren’t devouring the findings of fossil hunters. I’m afraid that that might be partly because creationist teachings have been normalized, at least in the United States, and I want to help break down, clearly and understandably, why creationism holds no answers about human origins whatsoever.

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Why Paleoanthropology Leads to Atheism

Sometimes I feel like I’m having an identity crisis. Or at least, my blog is. I started writing in 2016 under the persona and blog title of The Closet Atheist. I’ve written over 180 posts mostly about atheism, because that’s what this blog was, and is, about. But when I started, I knew I had a lot of ideas for blog posts and that I would continue to get more ideas and have more experiences that I could write about, but there is only so much to say about God not existing.

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The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack Review

Three weeks ago, I reviewed my first ever Ian Tattersall book, Masters of the Planet. As I said then, Ian Tattersall is the curator of the American Museum of Natural History’s Spitzer Hall of Human Origins. He’s been involved in paleoanthropology since the 60’s, and his books combine his undeniable expertise with just enough of his own evidence-based opinions and a dash of wit.

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Masters of the Planet Review

If you have been following my blog for a while, or if you’ve stumbled upon my Instagram, then you might know that I’m becoming a bit of a fanatic for paleoanthropology. The study of human origins has taken over my bookshelf, and I’ve found myself daydreaming about going back to human origins exhibits in museums. This is easy to do each time I get really lost in another book on the topic. This time, that book was Ian Tattersall’s Masters of the Planet.

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